Y is for Yesteryear

Y

I have always been a little obsessed with days gone by.

Even as a kid, I loved watching movies and TV shows that took place in another time.

giphy

Once I was older and living on my own, all of my house-decorating tastes drifted toward the eighteenth and nineteenth century.

7ea10338aaa3c6dddcf5cf2962620c31

adb2677ac4f1f6f70f3e747fb253ba92

And now, with the popularity of steampunk, once can even wear twenty-first century clothing flavored by the gothic and Victorian.

steam-punk-1833041_1280

I even have dogs that are throwbacks, reminiscent of the English manor home and laps of aristocrats. Mostly laps, really. Of any kind. (Italian greyhounds are great for Renaissance paintings and thigh warming).

italian-greyhound-2865704_1280davidGerard David, ‘The Virgin and Child with Saints and Donor’,
probably 1510. London, The National Gallery. (Italian grey on the tile)

The 2011 Woody Allen movie, Midnight in Paris, addresses this theme. I don’t want to give anything away because it’s definitely an Allen movie worth seeing, but the main character, played by Owen Wilson, is obsessed with the past. He has a chance to go back and visit some of the characters from the time periods he loves, but he finds that they, too, are longing for a time gone by. In essence, people in every period of history long for the past.

Do you agree? Are we innately wired to long for the past?

6 thoughts on “Y is for Yesteryear”

  1. I think we tend to think of the past as being awash in romance and graces that we mourn the loss of… forgetting that life was a lot harder back then and there’s really nothing all that romantic about someone who only bathes once a week…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes! The past just seems more INTERESTING in so many ways. Sure there were things that were much harder. But I think there are things we are dealing with now, that are very difficult in their own ways, that people in the past never had to even think about. I’ve been through phases of loving the Renaissance, Civil War, and the 1930s-40s.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s